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Later, I worked at the mill on the green chain and pulled the dry chain while continuing my education. Further steps should be taken to improve the adequacy of provider networks and formularies. Critical Theory and Information Studies: He glides across a golden field above the harvest moon. He returned to Kandy in Aug I got out of the woods in

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In the case of the double cut band, the shark tooth design is almost exactly the same on both edges of the blade. Sometimes less sophisticated sinlge cut bands have a smooth non-wavey edge. Jeff, Thanks for the clarification. My son and I and our wives toured this mill last December and thanks to our guide, Don Oakes, came away with a profound appreciation for an industry that was once nearly ubiquitous in the Northwest.

What a great experience! It has many pictures of the interiors of mills using double bands that sawed on both directions of the carriage…. I used to work there from until I started on the green chain end then moved to the planer side, and after that I was the pond monkey for a while.

Gary, I sent along a comment earlier but saw a comment and answer that may need some clarification. The teeth on the off-side back of the band actually have two functions. On ones this large they do register for sharpening, which is not always the case on a small band. Early on they used the flat back band blades and found when even a small splinter stuck out it could catch the back of the blade and pull it off of the wheels.

I grew up in Albany. We would often spend hours down by the river watching the logging trucks come in and dump their loads down The slide into the Willamette. They didn;t use any little unloader. The truck would park at the very edge where the nearly vertical logs of the chute reached the edge of the bank.

The truck driver would remove the chains that held the log s on the rig and then release the blocks on the river side. There was a cable anchored near the edge of the slide and it lay across the path of the truck. When ready, the cable was pulled up by a huge hoist on the other side of the truck and the logs would be slid off and onto the drop. Often the load would consist of ONE log — often 6 or 8 feet in diameter.

A man or men walking on the logs in the river would form and secure them into a raft. When it was completed, a tug would take it down river. I understand some of these rafts were towed all the way to Japan. Every logger wore boots with LONG sharp spikes. When he left, the blocks were dumped back to await the next logger. There is a steam powered saw mill in Port Alberni,B. I, too think that used to be a double cut saw. A bit of information from someone that grew up in the logging capital of the world, Coos Bay, Oregon.

During summer vacations, while in college, I worked in mills and log dumps in Coos Bay, Springfield and Eugene. This allowed the logs to roll off easily into the water where the pond man would use his pike pole to put them in place.

Often this was in a raft that was then pulled by a tug boat to the mill slip where the logs would be raised to the head rig to be sawn. At that time there was no log bronc as shown in the pictures. The log bronc was invented by Fred Nelson of Coos Bay in about as he was a pond man working for what had been the largest lumber company in the world at that time, the Coos Bay Lumber Company, Coos Bay Lumber had their own railroad, and several ocean going ships to deliver their lumber.

At that time Coos Bay was the 4th largest tonnage shipping port in the world because of the lumber the shipper and its weight. Back to Fred Nelson, he has several different versions of his log bronc and was expermenting with various motors and positions for the motor.

The motor was near the center of the boat and had to be able to run while being turned degrees. This allowed the bronc to push in any direction. Coos Bay lumber got his patent for him. The device was hooked to the head rig and measured the cuts, time to cut, return of the carriage and load time as well as blade changing time. I still have the invention at my house. The workers refused to work with it claiming that the stock holders, being mostly Easterners, would not understand why there was so much time not actually cutting.

So his invention was never used and I was told that it was donated to a forestry school. Because the pond men had all been in that line of work for tens of years in the salt spray, sun, rain and Coos Bay wind I was near the end of the summer when the wind quit blowing one day when shirts were removed and I discovered which of the pond men weilding the pike poles was black. All great guys and super workers. They have a small steam powered mill there that uses a big steam powered circular saw that people get to watch in operation.

The whole park is facinating with restored heavy machinery and musiums. Thank you for a wonderful pictorial record it makes the racksaw driven by a single cylinder tractor I worked at Avoncroft Museum, Bromsgrove, England look like a toy.

My largest timbers were 40ft Pitch Pine spars for the windmill I worked for 15 years. What a fantastic article. I grew up in Aberdeen, Wash. I remember as a young lad, standing along the roadside, watching the log trucks heading for town with a three log load or just a single log. Thanks Steve Hatfield W. Wow, what an article — beautiful photos and each step in production so well explained.

It has been rebuilt, supposedly as it was in the late 19th century. I remember the noise and the smell. Having looked at your presentation, the first thing I would think about is danger. There must have been terrible accidents from time to time. My dad was among his many trades, a mill wright. This wonderful picture story gives me a vision of what being a mill wright entails.

I always considered the task of positioning and aligning large equipment, but had no concept of the tasks of operation and maintainance. Hope to visit the site in the future. Many thanks for a great piece of journalism. Gary; Have enjoyed your roadshows here in the Seattle, WA area. I really enjoyed the article about the Hull-Oakes mill as it re-kindled thoughts about my growing up. Aa a kid, I grew up in a Washington logging town not far from Aberdeen, WA where we had seven sawmills and shingle mills operating.

My father, uncles and cousins all worked in the mills or the woods. The mill used the bark and sawdust for hog fuel to power the boilers and produce steam to drive generators and for the dry kilns. The mill had converted from steam to electricity after WWII. Later, I worked at the mill on the green chain and pulled the dry chain while continuing my education. The mill is still there and when I go back to visit family the smells of the mill carry me back to those times over forty years ago.

As an engineer and American History hobbyist, I find this fantastic and heart warming. This is what the American culture is all about; hard work and endurance. I just want to know one thing….. Where do they get spare parts? What a wonderfully interesting article. The photos and dialogue were also very interesting. It takes a special person to do that job and do it well.

Thanks for sharing, it was great. As an engineer and long-time member of the Society of Industrial Archaelogy, I found the story and pix of the saw mill just great. Gary, Thanks for the memories brought back from 55 years ago when I worked my way up from the green chain to pond monkey in a Dayville, Oregon mill long gone! The first few weeks until I got my balance, I was always working soaking wet but worse were the jeers and laughter from my fellow millhands.

The pictures, descriptions, and comments were all first class. Gary, thanks for a wonderful article! As a mechanical engineer and a woodworker I was fascinated by all the equipment. Your article really made me think about what we value in life. A great story and an excellent reflection of the past. Having grown up around small circle saw mills in Colorado I am facinated at the size and capabilities of the large mills.

Makes me sad that a great industry has nearly died- the loss to our economy and the loss of a sustained forest progam is very troubling. Gary, Thank you for the enlightenment. It just goes to show what diligent maintenance and proper blade sharpening will do. I will save your wonderful article and show it to others. Thanks so much for this presentation.

What a treat to be able to make it real rather than theoretical. This was wonderful and just what we needed to really understand the workings of the mill. I have a new respect for all of the work that goes into preparing this natural resource for our use.

Gary, Thanks for a wonderful presentation. This harkens me back to the years of through the fall of when I worked for Harold Hollenbeck who had a mill at Trout Lake, Washington. I did not work inside of the mill, but I knew what the whole operation was all about. This operation was not too different than where I worked except this mill could not handle the long timbers.

Thanks again for a job well done. This is something that all the older folks would like to see and read again and many would have some great stories to add to this very interesting e-mail from their past.

I have never seen or read anything like this before, pass this on to all your e-mail buddies,family and friends. I found this presentation very uplifting.

As a retired educator having taught both art and history i feel that these types of presentations are essential to preserving the history of this great country of ours.

After retiring I took up wood carving as a hobby and way to make a few extra bucks. I am going to pass this on to all of the woodcarvers and history buffs on my e-mail list. He worked in the spokane area. I do have some pictures of some of the crews and mill.

My father Frank was a farmer, small business man and an owner of a three bench corley mill in Michigan. It was hard work and two of us were called to serve in the military,so dad sold the mill and the farm in the fifties. Two of the five of us brothers are deceased or long since retired. I enjoyed the program and have never forgotten the operation of a mill. I retired in and nosed around a wood mizer portable mill to buy some slabwood and started to pile lumber and slabs for this owner because he was handicapped and got a part time summer job.

He gave me wood and lumber to build a small tool storage building and asked me to run the mill for him after we sawed about 40, bd. My old Navy buddy who I served with in the SeaBees sent this to me and I will treasure it and share it with others.

I loved reading and looking through this article. The mill and its staff have my hearty admiration. Awesome, do they do tours? I need to take my kids to see this awesome mill next time I am home. It looks like a green operation to me using their wood waste to heat the boiler. I toured this mill and took a number of photos. This mill is a throwback to the past and I love the history.

After college, I worked in the Weyerhaeuser sawmill in Springfield, Oregon. They had a 10 foot bandmill for the large logs but everything was pretty much computerized at the time. The smells, the flow through the mill, and skill sets required by the various machine operators will also be remembered.

Thanks for sharing the Hull-Oakes story. Dad was a logger and pony-sawyer skilled labor. Nineteen sixty-seven, , Dad remarked how many people lost their jobs, how many families were no longer there. How he greived that year. Our town housed one of the largest sawmills in the British Commonwealth, owned at the time by B. These pictures bring back a lot of memories for me as my father was the chargehand electrician for many years and I worked part time in the mill while in high school and post secondary school.

This series of photos and descriptions of the mill workings is a treasure and should be in a museum for posterity. May I suggest sending it to the forestry museum in Duncan, B. It is very closely reminiscent of all that I remember in Youbou. Well done to those who developed it. My dad worked in the woods and then in sawmills and planer mills all his working life. By the time I can remember he was working in a planer mill in Junction City, Oregon for his brother-in-law, Don Shelton.

These pictures provoke wonderful memories of my childhood and visiting daddy at the mill! Thank you for the trip down memory lane and a more gentle time. Thanks to Grant Cunningham for the link. One of the last steam powered mills in the east was torn down to make way for the Georgia Dome in Atlanta about 20 years ago.

I used to go there to pick up bundles of survey stakes. I loved to stop by and watch the mill run. Thanks for a wonderful presentation. It brought back memories of my first job out of High School. With corked shoes I snagged the logs, pulled them into the mill, cut to length and split them to shingle bolt size.

It was good exercise for an 18 year old and has stood me well and I feel I could still do it at I purchased the the old Car-Win cedar mill in Forks Wa. It cut old growth cedar and exported it all over the world. Before I dismantled the mill I took hundreds of photos and of course recognize many of the same equipment as was in your presentation.

I restored the straddle buggy and take it for a short ride now and then. This mill was not steam operated but it took so much power that when it started all the light in Forks dimmed. This mill also had planers and they sold a finished cedar product. Thanks again Respectfully Bill Sperry. I toured the mill last fall and still have short videos of the headrig cutting huge timbers on my cell phone. This was an absolute treat. Nice to have keepsakes around.

It is great to see a wonderful mill like this still in operation. I have a large circle saw 64inch in front of my house powered by a steam engine.. It has an atlas engine with a 10 inch bore and 14 inch stroke..

The headblocks are adjustable, so something a little larger could be set up for. The boiler is horizontal and has 92 3 inch flues 14 ft one inch long in it. The great area is five by nine feet. We fire it on slabs and railroad ties. The engine is an Atlas manufactured in Indianapolis Indiana. The flywheel is about five feet in diameter and 14 inches wide. It drives a 10 inch flat belt which goes to the husk and an edger. Sawdust is carried out by a drag chain.

I have a machine shop next door in which all the lumber except the poles was sawed on this mill. Schwenk passed away a few years after setting up this mill. He had always wanted one. He also owned a horsepower Nichols Sheppard engine, a A. Baker engine and a Minneapolis engine,and his fathers engine a M. Rumley engine built here in La Porte Indian. The baker engine was his favorite. Baker had invented a very modern valve gear for the engine, and was sought after by many railroads to put his steam efficient valve gear on their engines.

I new have a two cylinder upright westinghouse single acting engine to be used for the swing cut off saw, and a two cylinder water pump engine. We also have a twin cylinder pumping engine one injector,and a manual pump for water in the boiler. You just cant beat the smells and sounds of a saw mill running cutting oak and steaming steam cylinder oil in the air. My hat goes off to you guys there for keeping your mill operating. I guess I am showing my age. I was lucky enough to run all the steam locomotives at Cedar Point in Sandusky Ohio for two summers.

I pulled five cars four trips an hour and hauled three hundred and fifty passengers on every trip. The second year I not only ran the engines, but fired, took on water, and shovelled the coal into the tenders every morning by hand by myself. We had the old waste stuffed journals and I oiled them all every morning. I also started the fires, blew out the flews with a steam hose to knock out the excess soot.

My friend Don was one of the last to shock wheat and oats and corn here so he could thresh it with his old advance rumley separator. Come to Indiana in the fall to our threshing show. I was one of the founders about 25 to 30 years ago. By the way the boiler on our mill formerly heated the New York Central track pan in Chesterton Indiana, and was hauled over to this area on a wagon drawn by horses. Best Regards, Rich Lidke I have a video of our mill on here made by a friend. Thankyou for a wonderful journey through the operations of an old Steam driven sawmill.

Thank you, and I hope the mill still keeps going for generations to come. If at all possible, young children age should see this process to become aware of the hard ardous work necessary to obtain wood down to paper.

We are honing in on becoming more green and appreciative of nature but a hands on visible look would be worth a thousand words. I am very impressed and enjoyed reading about the process of a tree. Later, my father and his brother took over the operation around In my cousin and myself both started working on the mill and in the woods of central PA cutting timber and running the backend of the mill.

We would take the lumber off the edger and stack it and cut all the slabs and edgings to either fire wood size or slabs for firing the brick yard kilms. We sold the sawdust also. This story really brought back the memories from that time.

We supplied a lot of ties to the railroad and prime oak for hardwood flooring. We also subblied ash blanks to be turned into handles and baseball bats. We also custom cut lumber for many special projects including homes and other buildings which required special timbers.

It was quite an experience. One of the stories my father told me about my grandfather was that when he was young, he lived in a logging camp.

On Saturdays, the logging camps would get together and each camp would have a camp champion to box bare knuckle. My grandfather was champion for a number of years and according to Dad, wan never defeated. A very enjoyable and informative presentation. I learned quite a bit with each picture. I love history information like this and hopefully it will stay around for many years for others to see and learn from. I sure am glad that I have taken the tour and being from California, plan on coming up north to take the physical tour so I can see, hear and smell the complete process.

I hope that will be o. I was sent this by a friend who knows my interest in steam power. But I found the whole mill operation absolutely fascinating. An operation like this is a one of a kind thing and deserves to be kept in use as long as possible. I noticed that they say the steam engines have less trouble than anything else they could use. Unfortunately boilers are maintenance intensive by comparison. Thanks for all the work to put this together.

I grew up with this mill. My dad worked there until he died in I spent my summers during high school with Hull family across the road from the mill. Field trip to San Francisco when in sixth grade spent the night on The C. Thayer and did all the stuff that was done on the ship back when it was in operation.

Great photos of mill. It should not be closed down. I graded lumber after it was dried in the kilns for a few years and then changed to the river crew, where I fed logs into the mill in a steel cable hoist, up to the head rig. I sometimes worked as an off bearer behind the head rig, but finally transferred to the log dump.

I ran the cantilever dump, lifting the entire loads off of the trucks and dumping them into the river where they were sorted and graded to be formed into rafts and stored until needed by the mill. Then the truck trailers were loaded back onto the trucks, so they could return to the woods for another load.

IP built a paper mill next to the saw mill and plywood plant, and used the slabs from squaring up the logs to chip into pieces to digest into paper pulp. The logs had to be barked before they could use them, so they were cold decked and not dumped into the river anymore. The old cantilever dump was sold to a shipyard across the river in Reedsport to lift boats onto the drydock.

IP cut all of their timber and shipped it to China. Leaving Gardiner like so many other lumber towns in the Pacific Northwest. I walked and sorted the logs before sending them into the mill. But, it sort of made me mad as I sat and thought about it. We live in a country where the ones who are rewarded most handsomely are those who produce absolutely nothing of value. Here, we have workers who actually work, yet more and more of their country is owned by the bankers, lawyers and speculators, those who have produced little of value for our country.

Long live sawmill workers. I just called them up and asked if I could visit and they said yes. While I was there, one of the employees took me on a tour. Same thing the second time I went. You should make a video and get this on a program like This Old House.

What a great story and my hat is off to those that have spent their life working at this mill. I moved from N. Last year they closed the mill at Frenchtown and the Lumber mill at Bonner,Mt.

It is appalling that we now send our logs over to China to get made into different products and when they are finished they are shipped back to the U. I have seen this when I drove Truck picking up loads from the docks in Ca.

Ironically I have even been sent to deliver loads and pick them up at the papermill plant in Frenchtown,Mt.. I can remember everything coming from Japan when I was growing up and now our country is suffering from loss of jobs because our politicians,bankers and government has sold us short. If you have a favorite picture and would like it posted on this page, please email the picture to me in jpg format.

I will make room here for all good pictures of "Old Time Shacks". Thank you for viewing my Website and Don't forget to leave your comments in the Guestbook. Free website hit counter. Please help me with this important project. Howell, MI www. I appreciate all the positive comments left in my Guest Book by you the Ham Community.

Guestbook comments should be short 2 or 3 lines. Centaurus, , p. Peter Lind , Marcuse and Freedom London: Croom Helm, , p. Lukes , The Flight into Inwardness: Lee Ann Osbun , The problem of participation: Roland Roth , Rebellische Subjektivität: Campus, , p.

Cincel, , S.: Axel Honneth, Albrecht Wellmer eds. Referate eines Symposiums der Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung vom Dezember in Ludwigsburg , Harvest House, , p.

Fred Alford in Contemporary Sociology Vol. Horkheimer und Marcuse," in: André Vachet , Marcuse, la révolution radicale et le nouveau socialisme: Editions de l'Université d'Ottawa, , p. Rolf Wiggershaus , Die Frankfurter Schule: Hanser, , p; Bibliography: Lang, , p. Ben Agger , "Marcuse's Aesthetic Politics: Ideology-Critique and Socialist Ontology," in: Columbia University Press,, , pages. Kelly , "Possessing Leisure: VEblen and Marcuse Reconsidered," in: World Leisure and Recreation Thorstein Veblen presented leisure as an economic symbol of social status.

Herbert Marcuse argued that leisure is part of the one-dimensionality of alienated life defined in terms of possessions and market participation. Free and self-determinative action is reduced to choices of products and packaged experiences. Leisure as earned time and purchasing power is one aspect of buying into the capitalist system designed to protect and reward investment capital first. Such alienated leisure is compared to concepts of leisure as action and creative freedom.

However, research into what most people actually do and the meanings they ascribe to their activity suggests that neither the commodification critique nor the creative ideal adequately explain the diversity of contemporary leisure. Neither, on the other hand, is without analytical merit. The differences are partly based on perspectives. Each approach asks different questions. Veblen and Marcuse are probably both right… and incomplete. Another metaphor is offered to augment the themes of status symbolism and repressive commodification.

Evidence for any perspective, however, is incomplete. Marte-Bettina Partsch , Entfremdung und Revolution: Nicht für den Austausch Webel et al , Marcuse: University Press of America, c , p. Eric Wainwright , "Herbert Marcuse: Freedom and Dialectic," Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies This article is mainly concerned with the analysis and evaluation of Marcuse's conceptualisation of freedom.

Marcuse differentiates between the realm of freedom and freedom itself — which exists independently of the realm of freedom. The point is made that freedom from want is the substance of all other forms of freedom. The article subsequently focuses on the theoretical and practical considerations of Marcuse's dialectic, followed by a consideration of the factors that limit the possibilities for the attainment of freedom. Man's movement to freedom, a new genesis for all men, is symbolised in the end of alienation.

The article concludes with some points of criticism on Marcuse's use of the dialectic, his belief in the power of destruction, and his idea of conversion. Ideological and Socio-Historical Context," in: Heinz Ludwig Arnold ed. M H47 Spanish: Bolivar Meza, Rosendo , Tendencias actuales de la izquierda en México: The index lists pp. Maslow's journals are full of critical references to Herbert, and ambivalent to Frank whom he sees as "betraying" him at the time of Herbert's departure to San Diego but Manuel remained a friend, and delivered a eulogy at Maslow's funeral.

Maslow's biography describes Herbert's leaving of Brandeis or non-renewal of contract as a political act by its president, and Manuel's departure, along with others as one of solidarity with Marcuse.

But then I see that later Manuel is professor emeritus at Brandeis, Heinz Jansohn [et al. Joan Nordquist , Herbert Marcuse: A Bibliography Santa Cruz, Calif.: Reference and Research Services, , 60p.

Introduction to social theory: Pippin, Andrew Feenberg, Charles Webel eds. Critical Theory and the Promise of Utopia Basingstoke: Michael Walzer , The company of critics: Ssocial criticism and political commitment in the twentieth century New York: Basic Books, , p. Dobson , The concepts of reason and essence in the writings of Herbert Marcuse: With special emphasis on the period , Thesis Ph. Gvozden Flego und Wolfdietrich Schmied-Kowarzik eds. Marcuse-Symposion in Dubrovnik Giessen: Germinal, , p.

Arbeiterbewegung und Gesellschaftswissenschaft, , p. Reich y Marcuse Cuernavaca, Mor.: Surrealist Subversion [Chicago] 4 , ; includes correspondence by Marcuse to the Chicago Surrealist group in as appendix pages Zur Aktualität von Herbert Marcuse. Mit Beiträgen von O. Pauline Aweto Oghominene , Man in the technological society: Verlag , [2nd, corrected edition]. Olafson, Frederick, "Irrtum oder Verrat an der Philosophie: Cites literature up to summer Publications page, Mellen, , S.

Berkeley Journal of Sociology 35 , Theorie bei Marcuse, Habermas u. Gerhard Schweppenhäuser , Emanzipationstheorie und Ideologiekritik: Benjamin, Marcuse, Habermas und die politische Theologie Düsseldorf: Patmos, , p. Bernard Görlich , Die Wette mit Freud: Drei Studien zu Herbert Marcuse Frankfurt: Nexus, , S. Ilan Gur-Ze'ev , "Art and utopia: Friedrich Schiller and Herbert Marcuse," in: Collections for Socialist Thought.

Weimarer Beiträge , Bd. Heidegger Studies 7 , Studies in Soviet Thought Ben Agger , The Discourse of Domination: Northwestern University Press, , p. André Clergue , Mon père, je m'arcuse Nîmes: Lacour, , S.: Institut für Sozialforschung ed. Revised papers from a conference held in Frankfurt am Main on the occasion of the opening of the Herbert-Marcuse-Archiv. Schmidt, Alfred, "Herbert Marcuse: Versuch einer Vergegenwärtigung seiner sozialphilosophischen und politischen Ideen.

Flego, Gvozden, "Erotisieren statt sublimieren. Douglas Kellner, "Marcuse in the s: Some New Textual Discoveries. Negative Responses to Technology," in: Science Fiction Studies Gérard Raulet , Herbert Marcuse: Presses universitaires de France, , p amazon. John Abromeit , Existential Marxism: Herbert Marcuse's critical confrontation with Martin Heidegger, to and beyond Stanford Univ.

Sharpe, Partial text available at Questia. Western Marxism and Soviet-Type Societies 1. Authoritarian Socialism and the Frankfurt School 3 2. Between Apology and Critique: Marcuse's Soviet Marxism 22 3. Critical Sociology and Authoritarian State Socialism 59 4. From Western to Eastern Marxism: Rudolf Bahro 84 5. Immanent Critique and Authoritarian Socialism: Poland 9. Poland The Democratic Theory of the Polish Opposition: Normative Intentions and Strategic Ambiguities Revolution, Civil Society, and Democracy Partial text available from Questia.

Bernstein's Search for an Audience, 49 Lenin: Time, Place, and Cultural Studies: Rhetoric Between System and Lifeworld: Ecología Política , No. Clemens Knobloch , "'68 verweht?: Herbert Marcuse, Theoretiker der Revolte," in: Blätter für deutsche und internationale Politik , Bonn, 38 , S.

Dariusz Aleksandrowicz , "Marx, Stalin, Marcuse: Die kritische Theorie in ideengeschichtlicher Sicht," in: Studies in East European Thought John Bokina and Timothy J. University Press of Kansas, Collection of 9 essays about Marcuse's work. A Hindsight Look at Soviet Marxism.

Douglas Kellner, "A Marcuse Renaissance? Pencek, formerly, Northern Arizona University, in Dec. The contributors generally seek to apply the critical, self-consciously political spirit of Marcuse's Freudian-Heideggerian-Neomarxism in the context of post-Soviet, postmodern s radical relativisms.

Contributors were invited to write on topics of their choice, which the editors have divided, with inevitably mixed success, into five sections: The 14 essays and useful introduction are notably free of the jargon that characterizes contemporary theorizing, but they also rely on the reader's prior familiarity with that theoretical literature. Moreover, this collection's unconcealed longing for intellectual and social revolution, as well as the often nostalgic view of '60s radicalism which includes, interestingly, disdain for political correctness as antipolitical and frivolous , may restrict its appeal to readers already of renascent New Left inclinations.

Expósito García , Mercedes. Heinz Otto Münch , Repression und Emanzipation: Zvi Tauber , Befreiung und das "Absurde": Bleicher, , S. Joan Alway , Critical Theory and Political possibilities: A49 Partial access at Questia. Departures from Traditional Marxism: The Eclipse of the Emancipatory Vision 31 -- Ch. Despair and Possibility in a Time of Eclipse 49 -- Ch. Marcuse's Search for a Subject 71 -- Ch. Reconstructing Critical Theory 99 -- Conclusion: Reconceptualizing Radical Politics Notes Works cited Guilford Press, , pages extended discussion of Aronson's encounter with Herbert in the "Marxist Itinerary" chapter as well as a coming to grips with Herbert's heritage in the final chapter.

Oxford University Press, , pp. Rolf Wiggershaus , The Frankfurt School: Andrew Feenberg , "Marcuse or Habermas: Inquiry , Elmont, NY, Ivrit, , , iv p. Donald Ipperciel , Freud als Aufklärer: Paul Alexander Juutilainen , Herbert's Hippopotamus: Cinema Guild, , 1 videocassette 70 min.

Philosopher and teacher, Herbert Marcuse, and the student movement of the late 's are described. Marcuse's effect on the University of California, San Diego is also explored.

George Katsiaficas, "Marcuse as an Activist: Reminiscences of His Theory and Practice," in: New Political Science Moran also wrote an entry on Herbert Marcuse for "Modern Germany: An Encyclopedia of History, People and Culture, Herbert Marcuse's The Aesthetic Dimension " in: Hinman rethinks "the bourgeois subject" following Marcuse's lead.

McCarthy , Romancing antiquity: German critique of the enlightenment from Weber to Habermas Lanham: Bompiani, , p. A C65 Kletsmeier, , 86 p published on CD in Stephan Bundschuh , "Und weil der Mensch ein Mensch ist Black Hawk Hancock , After the eclipse: Theoretical Background and Political Praxis," in: Negations 3 Winter , available on-line at: Paul Alexander Juutilainen , Twilights of Paradise 2 pts.

Von der Flaschenpost zum Molotowcocktail , 3 vols. Hamburger Edition, Ulf Liedke , "Freiheit: Anmerkungen zu Marcuses Lutherkritik," in: Günter Servais , Arbeit, Vernunft, Glück: Haag und Herchen, , S.

Shapiro and Valerie Malhotra Bentz , Mindful Inquiry in Social Research Sage An introduction to research in the social sciences and humanities in which critical theory plays an important role Trudy Steuernagel, "Marcuse and Biotechnology," in: Clemens Albrecht , "Marcuse, Horkheimer und der Tod: Social Text 58 Spring, , pp.

International Journal of Political Economy Leonardo Casini , Eros e utopia: Carocci, , S. Helmut Fahrenbach , "Existenzialismus und Marxismus: Ein frühes Projekt Herbert Marcuses," In: Zur Problematik menschlicher Emanzipation , S. David John Farmer , "Anti-Admin: With Help from Herbert Marcuse," in: This paper selects from a longer chapter which recapitulates and extends discussions on antiadministration anti-admin from the perspective of discourse theory.

First, it discusses discourse theory, explaining that the discourses of anti-admin aim toward the inclusion of marginalized or excluded perspectives. Second, it outlines some anti-admin theory. Parallel to the action of antimatter and matter, the interaction of freshly demarginalized discourse perspectives and traditional discourse can yield anti-admin resultants.

Third, the paper offers macro and micro examples of anti-admin gains in terms of problem definition and response resources. It underscores that antiadmin can recognize its affinity not only to the postmodern but also to critical theory perspectives.

Peter-Erwin Jansen und Redaktion "Perspektiven" eds. Texte zu Herbert Marcuse Frankfurt: Neue Kritik, , S. He is a specialist on theories of race and ethnicity. Jorge Coelho Soares, Marcuse. Thesis, University of Minnesota. Uri Zilbersheid , Jenseits der Arbeit: Centre of Universalism, , S.

Ventil, , p. Roger Behrens überprüft die emanzipatorische Praxis bei Herbert Marcuse. Michael Buckmiller ed. Offizin, , S. Antonino Firenze , Sapienza della natura: Jürgen Habermas , "Marcuse: Psychic thermidor and the rebirth of rebellious subjectivity," in: The Frankfurt School New York: Continuum, , xx, p. This book illustrates how Marcuse's theory sheds new light on current debates in both education and society involving issues of multiculturalism, postmodernism, civic education, the "culture wars," critical thinking, and critical literacy.

Reitz wrote on Apr. His notions of repressive desublimation and repressive tolerance are especially useful. I try to defend both of these contributions in my recent book " Art, Alienation, and the Humanities: I deal there also with the latest attack on Marcuse from the academic right, that of Kors and Silverglate, whose tolerance for racism and sexism on campus is disguised as a defense of free speech.

Reitz is the first to connect studies of Marcuse's concept of art with conceptions of aesthetic education and the only one who connects Marcuse's thought more broadly with the problematics of education. The result is an original and engaging study of Marcuse's work that provides fresh insight into one of the most important thinkers of our century.

Be sure to read it. Many thanks to Peter Marcuse and Harold Marcuse for making this available. It should be even more widely published. Gitai, himself a veteran of the war, has apparently followed his own experiences closely. His hero, Weinraub Liron Levo , is an earnest young bohemian who lectures his friend Ruso Tomer Ruso on Herbert Marcuse and, in the opening and closing scenes, smears paint on his girlfriend while they're making love.

The arty eroticism of these sequences stands in visual and emotional contrast to the rest of the movie, which shows men writhing in pain and covered in mud. A Bibliography Santa Cruz: See also Soares' essay on Doug Kellner's Illuminations site: Wilson, Allan Roy , One-dimensional society revisited an analysis of Herbert Marcuse's One dimensional man 34 years later Ottawa: National Library of Canada, , 3 microfiches. Zur Aktualität der Philosophie Herbert Marcuses' presentation falsely dated at philo.

Kevin Floyd , "Rethinking Reification: Marcuse, Psychoanalysis, and Gay Liberation," in: Social Text , No. Peter Wakefield , "Class in the Classroom: Engaging Hidden Identities," Metaphilosophy A seductive classroom presence, he attracted Germany's brightest young intellects during the s. Many were Jews, who ultimately would have to reconcile their philosophical and, often, personal commitments to Heidegger with his nefarious political views.

Looking closely at four of the most talented of their number, Richard Wolin, with the provocative directness his readers have come to expect, argues that troubling residues remain not far beneath the surface of their influential work.

Heidegger's Children is a book that many will seek to refute, but none can ignore. Dirk Röpcke und Raimund Bahr eds. Raffaele Laudani , Lo spettro della totalita: Universita degli studi di Torino, , p.

Raffaella Gherardi, Andre Tosel; co-tutor: Carlo Galli Note Generali: Universita degli studi di Torino, Dottorato di ricerca in storia del pensiero politico e delle istituzioni politiche, Herbert Marcuse and the Holocaust, ," in: New German Critique 85 Winter , Ein Beitrag zur zeitgenössischen Wahrnehmung der nationalsozialistischen Vernichtungspolitik" full text on this site and his project at the Humboldt-Universität: Hans-Georg Pott , "Marcuses später Widerruf," in: Studien zur Ästhetik und Poetik.

Matthew Sharpe , "Do universals have a reference? On the critical theory of Herbert Marcuse," Philosophy Today The views on universals and reference of Herbert Marcuse are discussed. Topics include the critique of pure analytic reason and universality in relation to negation.

Soysal, Soner, Technological rationality and one-dimensional man: Herbert Marcuse's critique of advanced industrial society. Thesis for the degree of Master of Science in the Department of Philosophy. Richard Wolin , " ," in: Political and Social Theory from Nietzsche to Habermas. Duke University Press, , pp.

Marcuse developed this idea in the context of his critique of what he called, in an eponymous essay, the "repressive tolerance" of American technological society. Marcuse's disturbing tendency to accept despotism for the sake of his progressive ideals, according to Wolin, was in part a consequence of his intellectual indebtedness to Plato and Rousseau, but it should also be seen in the light of his interwar experience of Weimar Germany's collapse and surrender to Hitler.

Marianne DeKoven , "Psychoanalysis and sixties utopianism," in: Laing's The Politics of Experience, Laing is a psychoanalyst who employs political, philosophical, and cultural discourses as, similarly, indispensable. There is a sense in both texts of a parallelism, almost an interchangeability among these discourses, as if each treats, in mutually reinforcing and mirroring ways, a crucial component of what is a unified whole.

I will also discuss very briefly the ways in which Luce Irigaray, writing at the end of what I would call the long Sixties, produces the same sort of totalizing, utopian project in Speculum of the Other Woman, For all of these projects, it is the utopian demand for reciprocal, mutually constitutive, total psychic, social, political, intellectual, and cultural change that creates this peculiar additive parallelism or intermeshing of discourses. Hauptwerke der Ungleichheitsforschung , Opladen , Zvi Tauber , "Criticizing Totalitarian Democracy: Herbert Marcuse and Alexis de Tocqueville," in: Lisa Zanetti , "Holding Contradictions: Marcuse and the Idea of Refusal," in: He also analyses the philosophical roots of the student rebellions of the sixties.

John Abromeit and W. A Critical Reader Routledge, ,. This volume is based on a conference held at UC Berkeley in , the year Herbert would have turned Eine Einführung Panorama, , pages [reprint of Junius edition] google books Elizabeth Butterfield , "Sartre and Marcuse on the relation between needs and normativity: Critical Essay 3rd paragraph: In this paper, I will investigate Sartre's claims regarding need as an element of the human condition, and I will compare them to the analysis of need found in the works of Marx and of Herbert Marcuse.

These comparisons will raise important questions, such as: Are these human needs to be considered permanent fixtures, or do they change historically? And, how might this affect their status as fundamental and truly human? Finally, is it even possible for us to recognize our real human needs, and to distinguish them from artificially created and alienated false "needs," while we exist in what Sartre identifies as the current state of subhumanity?

See also Herbert's article: Todestag ," at Socialistische Positionen , www. Franco Angeli, , p. Texts in German or Italian; Papers presented to the congress, Rome, , on the occasion of the centenary of the birth of H. Marcuse , philosopher. Maria Teresa Cardoso de Campos, Marcuse: Diego Giachetti , "Giugno Il Protagora , 4 luglio-dicembre un numero monografico dedicato a "L'immaginazione che voleva il potere.

Studi e testimonianze sul '68". Rolf Nölle , Sozialphilosophische Variablen: Monsenstein und Vannerdat, , S. Russell Rockwell , "Hegel and critical social theory: The Sociological Quarterly , Recently published archival material suggests the need to reexamine Herbert Marcuse's interpretation of Hegel's thought. Social theory generally will benefit from reflections upon Marcuse's historical attempts to understand contemporary societal domination, including its abstract forms, and his original social "translations" of Hegel's Subjective Logic.

Following sections on Being and Essence, the latter often favored by Marxists, the final part of Hegel's Science of Logic was undervalued in the development of critical social theory before Marcuse's close readings in the years Marcuse took the lead among Critical Theorists in explicating Hegel's texts.

Just as significant, Marcuse was among the first to point out the sociological relevance of key categories in the most abstract final sections of Hegel's most abstract work. The newly published materials document Marcuse's unique attempts to conceive Hegelian dialectic proper as itself a practical force of social transformations. Most important, these articles concern the relationship between theory and social practice that Marcuse investigated in Hegel's dialectic of the idea of the true and the idea of the good--the absolute idea.

Auch innerhalb der affirmativen Kultur bleibt die Kunst eine Provokation der bestehenden gesellschaftlichen Ordnung. Und gerade Schillers ästhetisches Konzept des Spieltriebs fordert die verdinglichte Logik der kapitalistischen Verhältnisse heraus, die den Menschen auf die entfremdete Existenz des Arbeiters reduziert. Stephen Brookfield , "Undermining the very democracy we seek to create: Studies in Continuing Education Discussion has long held an honored place in the pantheon of lionized adult education practices.

One of the most frequently venerated aspects of discussion is opening up conversation to include the widest possible diversity of perspectives and intellectual traditions. This democratic attempt to be open and inclusive is held to represent what is best about adult education—its humanistic concern to have all voices heard, all experiences analyzed, and all viewpoints honored. Herbert Marcuse's concept of repressive tolerance stands directly against these sentiments. Marcuse argues that an alternative idea, concept or text can be inserted into a discussion of familiar, mainstream materials in such a way that serves only to underscore the normality of the center while positioning the alternatives as exotic others.

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